Prevalence of Patients Taking Homeopathy Medicine for Non Communicable Diseases under Alternative Medical Care in Bangladesh: A Cross-sectional Study

Main Article Content

Nazmul Hasan
Emrul Kayes
M. Atiqul Haque

Abstract

Aim: This current study was intended to evaluate the respond of patients to the available homeopathic medicine health services at the designated government health facilities in Bangladesh. As a part of that, the potentiality of homeopathic medicines in managing non-communicable diseases (NCDs) including gynecological problems, skin diseases, and Ear-Nose-Throat (ENT) complaints was also determined.

Study Design: This study was conducted in a cross-sectional method; designed to collect two sets of data, one from the hospital registry, and another set was collected by interviewing the visiting patients.

Place and Duration of Study: This exploration was conducted within 10 (ten) randomly selected government hospitals, and data from first March 2017 to twenty-eighth February 2018 was considered. 

Material and Methods: In this study, 5 (five) upazilla health complexes (UHC), and 5 (five) district health complexes (DHC) were included. The collected data from these hospital registries were used for clinical data analysis. Using a predesigned questionnaire, another set of data was collected by interviewing the visiting patients; a group of 150 individual patients from these 10 hospitals (15*10=150, one hundred and fifty), was randomly nominated for demographic data analysis.

Result: The study revealed that there were 8% of patients taking homeopathic medicines among visiting patients at government hospitals. Both males (43%), females (57%) were taking help from this service. A calculated 35.33% of these patients completed the secondary school certificate, and patients with garments jobs (38%) are the principle consumers of this medical service. Patients with various non-communicable diseases including female diseases (22%), skin diseases (21%), ear-nose-throat (ENT) diseases (14%), cardio vascular diseases-CVD (13%), Hemorrhoid (13%), rheumatic fever (7%), and asthma (6%) were seeking homeopathic medicine service at the government hospitals.

Conclusion: This study result suggests with limited manpower, homeopathic medicine service helping significantly in the national health services.

Keywords:
Eczema, ENT, hemorrhoid, leucorrhoea, menstrual disorder, ovarian cyst, ringworm.

Article Details

How to Cite
Hasan, N., Kayes, E., & Atiqul Haque, M. (2020). Prevalence of Patients Taking Homeopathy Medicine for Non Communicable Diseases under Alternative Medical Care in Bangladesh: A Cross-sectional Study. Journal of Complementary and Alternative Medical Research, 8(4), 1-8. https://doi.org/10.9734/jocamr/2019/v8i430129
Section
Original Research Article

References

Shah SF, Mubeen SM, Mansoor S. Concepts of homeopathy among general population in Karachi, Pakistan. JPMA. 2010;60(667).

Woodward KN. The potential impact of the use of homeopathic and herbal remedies on monitoring the safety of prescription products. Human & Experimental Toxicology. 2005;24(5):219-33.

Pandya SK. Understanding brain, mind and soul: Contributions from neurology and neurosurgery. Mens Sana Monographs. 2011;9(1):129.

Vithoulkas G. Serious mistakes in meta-analysis of homeopathic research. Journal of Medicine and Life. 2017;10(1):47.

Paterson IC. Homeopathy: What is it and is it of value in the care of patients with cancer?. Clinical Oncolog. 2002;14(3):250-3.

Starr P. The social transformation of American medicine: The rise of a sovereign profession and the making of a vast industry. Basic Books; 2008.

Ullman D. A condensed history of homeopathy. Discovering homeopathy: Medicine for the 21st century. 1991:33-54.

Dantas F, Rampes H. Do homeopathic medicines provoke adverse effects? A systematic review. British Homoeopathic Journal. 2000;89:S35-8.

Avello ML, Avendaño CO, Mennickent SC. General aspects of homeopathy. Revista medica de Chile. 2009;137(1):115-20.

Eisenberg DM, Davis RB, Ettner SL, Appel S, Wilkey S, Van Rompay M, et. al. Trends in alternative medicine use in the United States, 1990-1997: results of a follow-up national survey. Jama. 1998;280(18):1569-75.

Ghosh AK. A short history of the development of homeopathy in India. Homeopathy. 2010;99(2):130-6.

Singh P, Yadav RJ, Pandey A. Utilization of indigenous systems of medicine & Homeopathy in India. Indian Journal of Medical Research. 2005;122(2):137.

Jacobs J, Jiménez LM, Malthouse S, Chapman E, Crothers D, Masuk M, et al. Homeopathic treatment of acute childhood diarrhea: results from a clinical trial in Nepal. The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. 2000;6(2):131-9.

Elahee SF, Hossain S, Zaki M. Bangladesh Medical Journal. 2009;37(2).
DOI:10.3329/bmj.v37i2.3590

Andaleeb SS, Siddiqui N, Khandakar S. Patient satisfaction with health services in Bangladesh. Health Policy and Planning. 2007;22(4):263-73.

Banerjee A, Chakrabarty SB, Karmakar SR, Chakrabarty A, Biswas SJ, Haque S et. al. Can homeopathy bring additional benefits to thalassemic patients on hydroxyurea therapy? Encouraging results of a preliminary study. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine. 2010;7(1):129-136.

Rashid SF, Akram O, Standing H. The sexual and reproductive health care market in Bangladesh: Where do poor women go?. Reproductive Health Matters. 2011;19(37):21-31.

Ahmed SM, Hossain MA, Chowdhury MR. Informal sector providers in Bangladesh: How equipped are they to provide rational health care?. Health Policy and Planning. 2009;24(6):467-78.

Trichard M, Chaufferin G, Nicoloyannis N. Pharmacoeconomic comparison between homeopathic and antibiotic treatment strategies in recurrent acute rhinopharyngitis in children. Homeopathy. 2005;94(1):3-9.

Hotez PJ, Molyneux DH, Fenwick A, Kumaresan J, Sachs SE, Sachs JD, et. al. Control of neglected tropical diseases. New England Journal of Medicine. 2007; 357(10):1018-27.

Kim Streatfield P, Khan WA, Bhuiya A, Hanifi SM, Alam N, Bagagnan CH, et. al. Adult non-communicable disease mortality in Africa and Asia: Evidence from INDEPTH Health and Demographic Surveillance System sites. Global Health Action. 2014;7(1):25365.

Msyamboza KP, Ngwira B, Dzowela T, Mvula C, Kathyola D, Harries AD, et al. The burden of selected chronic non-communicable diseases and their risk factors in Malawi: Nationwide steps survey. PLoS One. 2011;6(5): e20316.

Zaman MM, Ullah AK, Bhuiyan MR, Karim MN. Moniruzzaman and Rahman SMA. Noncommunicable Disease Prevention and Control Situation in a Primary Health Care Setting of Bangladesh: Design and Baseline Findings of an Intervention. Chronic Dis Int. 2016;3(1):1021.

Bleich SN, Koehlmoos TL, Rashid M, Peters DH, Anderson G. Non-communicable chronic disease in Bangladesh: Overview of existing programs and priorities going forward. Health Policy. 2011;100(2):282-9.

Ahmed SM, Alom BB, Anwar I, Begum T, Haque R, and Khan J AM et al. Bangladesh health system review. Health System in Transition. 2015;5:3.
[Accessed 29 December 2019]
Available:http://apps.searo.who.int/PDS_DOCS/B5409.pdf

Islam A, Biswas T. Health system in Bangladesh: Challenges and opportunities. American Journal of Health Research. 2014;2(6):366-74.

Roll S, Reinhold T, Pach D, Brinkhaus B, Icke K, Staab D, et al. Comparative effectiveness of homoeopathic vs. conventional therapy in usual care of atopic eczema in children: long-term medical and economic outcomes. PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e54973.

Yakir M, Kreitler S, Brzezinski A, Vithoulkas G, Oberbaum M, Bentwich Z. Effects of homeopathic treatment in women with premenstrual syndrome: A pilot study. British Homeopathic Journal. 2001;90(03):148-53.